Latest Posted Comments

Haven't been here in a few days? Now you can quickly bring yourself up to speed on the latest comments for all the projects and new breaks.

Topic: Today the Nevada Museum of Art begins $5.5 Expansion
Posted by: wise--guy- - 4/18/2015 9:56:28 PM
$5 dollar foot longs?

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: WJ - 4/17/2015 9:26:51 AM
The notion that a downtown area is going to flourish around ease of parking does not stand up. Wide sidewalks, bike lanes, better lighting, crosswalks that actually work; these are the things that will make midtown a more vibrant area that people want to visit, or better yet, live near. A dedicated parking area nearby, but not directly adjacent to Virginia St. would do just fine for people driving in to shop, eat, etc. I really like Reno Rambler's vignette - hopefully it will gain traction!

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Traditional Transportation - 4/16/2015 5:44:47 PM
This "debate" on curbside car parking really needs to be framed as just how long is someone willing to walk to get to the business of interest? 10 seconds? 40 seconds? Or, Oh-My-Gawd, a whole 2 minutes?!?! The tired whine of "can't find parking" is so lame. And just what do people really do if they have to walk, like, a whole minute or two to get to that special restaurant? . They linger and SPEND MORE MONEY!!

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: no_Valleys_guy - 4/16/2015 4:35:35 PM
Agree to widen sidewalks. Why not have a 3 or 4 story parking garage down in Midtown? In the space with the porno booths. Tear that building down, or use the vacant lot near it.

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Sara Lee - 4/16/2015 2:58:10 PM
I live in Old Southwest / Midtown and I'd much rather see bike lanes and big sidewalks in an effort to promote higher quality of life. If some people find it too arduous to drive from other neighborhoods and park at most a 5-minute walk from a spot they might like to shop at then so be it. There's already a well-developed lack of community, but complete support for cars, in the Foothills / South end of town, as well as Somersett, Caughlin, etc.

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Catherine - 4/16/2015 12:57:50 PM
I live in south Reno so I would rather see midtown have more parking and not the bike lanes. There are times I have tried to go to mid-town for dinner and left when I couldn't find parking, so it isn't just lunch time.

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Woodrow Stool - 4/16/2015 5:01:09 AM
^^ I have to agree with Larry - the sidewalk situation in Midtown is awful, that is simply not a walkable neighborhood in its current form. Whatever happens, repair the sidewalks and double their width. This will vastly improve pedestrian traffic and increase the "stickyness" of the neighborhood.

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Larry - 4/15/2015 8:33:38 PM
A business' so gut reaction is don't take my store front parking, but what they don't get is that large pedestrian friendly space in front of their store and bicycle access via bike lanes, makes their commercial neighborhood more attractive to stroll and shop and linger longer that those who just park, shop, and leave. These days, people are more willing to park five or six blocks away and get exercise. It's no longer about getting in and quickly but enjoying a stroll and lingering on a large sidewalk without parked cars obscuring your view of store fronts. Walkable commercial neighborhoods with bicycle access are more profitable than strip malls or shops along busy boulevards w on street parking. They're safer too. Look past the end of your own nose and think about the neighborhood and the future that is less carcentric. http://www.citylab.com/cityfixer/2015/03/the-complete-business-case-for-converting-street-parking-into-bike-lanes/387595/

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Devin - 4/15/2015 7:16:41 PM
I feel bike lanes are essential for South Virginia Street. I think the South Virginia corridor thing should be trashed, and a new plan developed to make South Virginia more like a main street with mom and pop businesses, with large sidewalks, bike lanes, and minimal street parking.

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Reno Rambler - 4/15/2015 6:52:26 PM
Thanks for the mention. FYI, the configuration you posted from my blog was based around the narrowest section and was really only an experiment to see if a buffered cycle track could fit in the space while keeping car parking on one side of the street. I'm no professional engineer though I have taken urban analysis classes and have been sitting on the RTCs Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee for years. Lots to respond to here but let me at least point out that at the meeting two well-known business owners in the Midtown area pretty explicitly challenged the RTC to come up with something with more vision that makes the area a great place, not just a corridor, and asked for more pedestrian and bike space. The other, more important thing to note is the growing body of data out there showing that these more visionary street configurations that include lots of space for pedestrians, bike lanes, and slowing traffic down, help businesses prosper. Sometimes Great Street design seems counter-intuitive.

Topic: The Great Midtown Parking Debate Continues
Posted by: Jay - 4/15/2015 3:01:23 PM
The businesses will experience a huge benefit if there is space in front of their storefronts. 10' sidewalk minimum with larger areas for outside activities. The no-turn-lane issue can be managed on the narrowest portions and I think the bike lanes are the first luxury to give up. The side streets and Allys could be improved for bike use. Second, I'd give up landscaping on the narrow sections. It is just a 'nature band-aid' when the configuration is not functional.

Topic: El Cortez's Awning Comes Down, Exposes Beautiful Work Underneath
Posted by: H.E. - 4/15/2015 12:53:43 PM
Just got a peek at the terracotta today, that is amazing! I can't believe it was ever covered up

Topic: El Cortez's Awning Comes Down, Exposes Beautiful Work Underneath
Posted by: Justin - 4/10/2015 5:29:04 PM
Now about those even more hideous window coolers

Topic: El Cortez's Awning Comes Down, Exposes Beautiful Work Underneath
Posted by: no-valleys--guy - 4/10/2015 11:51:10 AM
Yep that awning was ugly. and maybe the El Cortez could use some LED colored lighting to enhance its lines and architecture. And clean the sidewalk in front, or put in some Xeriscapeing.

Topic: El Cortez's Awning Comes Down, Exposes Beautiful Work Underneath
Posted by: DowntownMakeoverDude - 4/10/2015 10:58:45 AM
Oops! They are at the bottom of the article.

Topic: El Cortez's Awning Comes Down, Exposes Beautiful Work Underneath
Posted by: Nirvana Klein - 4/10/2015 10:53:19 AM
Photo credits, please!

Topic: Public Input for Virginia Street Corridor Project
Posted by: no-valleys-guy - 4/9/2015 8:58:02 PM
So Virginia needs a major re-work. Its pretty rough, streetlights look bad. Similar to what Wells Ave.s had done a decade ago.

Topic: Siegel Weighing Two Options for Awnings at El Cortez
Posted by: Melodie - 4/7/2015 7:57:40 AM
The second style, with the awnings, is so classy and stylish, yet at the same time warm and inviting. My vote is clearly choice 2.

Topic: Public Input for Virginia Street Corridor Project
Posted by: Brian Hunt - 4/6/2015 9:07:10 PM
I am really excited about the chance to improve the street in Midtown. Great streets are a platform for strong towns. I will be attending these public workshops. Unfortunately, I believe, RTC's current plans are not good enough. In general, the current plan is to widen the sidewalks, which should be celebrated (although, I imagine RTC was only one ADA lawsuit away from being forced to do this anyway). Really nothing is being done to make the street more hospitable. A minor reduction in speed limit will not be enough to make the street really good for people. I fear the street will still be too wide, too fast, and over engineered "to accommodate all users". Should Midtown be a corridor to move cars and people through quickly? Or will it be a place that people will come to enjoy the best of Reno's local bars, restaurants, and small businesses? We need to ask ourselves what we want the street to "feel" like. Personally, I want it to feel like a great Main Street. I want it to narrow enough that you can cross traffic it in a few steps. I want it to have street trees (something that will not fit on the current plan in many places). I want traffic to be slow, but flow better. This will make it possible to have outside cafe seating. I want the street to be so good that people "sitting" on empty lots will either develop them or sell them - out of greed. Reno needs one great street. Let's convince RTC that Reno is ready for it!

Topic: Public Input for Virginia Street Corridor Project
Posted by: Brian Hunt - 4/6/2015 9:06:37 PM
I am really excited about the chance to improve the street in Midtown. Great streets are a platform for strong towns. I will be attending these public workshops. Unfortunately, I believe, RTC's current plans are not good enough. In general, the current plan is to widen the sidewalks, which should be celebrated (although, I imagine RTC was only one ADA lawsuit away from being forced to do this anyway). Really nothing is being done to make the street more hospitable. A minor reduction in speed limit will not be enough to make the street really good for people. I fear the street will still be too wide, too fast, and over engineered "to accommodate all users". Should Midtown be a corridor to move cars and people through quickly? Or will it be a place that people will come to enjoy the best of Reno's local bars, restaurants, and small businesses? We need to ask ourselves what we want the street to "feel" like. Personally, I want it to feel like a great Main Street. I want it to narrow enough that you can cross traffic it in a few steps. I want it to have street trees (something that will not fit on the current plan in many places). I want traffic to be slow, but flow better. This will make it possible to have outside cafe seating. I want the street to be so good that people "sitting" on empty lots will either develop them or sell them - out of greed. Reno needs one great street. Let's convince RTC that Reno is ready for it!

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